The Future of Australian Jobs in the Disruptive Age

We’re transitioning into the ‘knowledge economy’. Digital is disrupting industries and industries are disrupting themselves. Technological innovations and machine automation are transforming the very fabric of our workforce.

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This is what everyone is saying about Australia’s future, but what does it actually mean?
Pay attention to the media and you’ll be bombarded with all of these buzz-terms. With so much noise, it can be hard to paint a clear picture of what the future has in store for Australia. Let’s summarise and point you in the right direction.

What is a knowledge economy?
It’s an economy driven and shaped by ideas. Leading the way is innovation. New ways to deal with old, current, and future problems are developed and these solutions are sold in one form or another for profit. Both the public and commercial sectors participate, and the often intangible intellectual skills and knowledge become the commodity.

So, instead of manufacturing cars, we’re manufacturing ideas – intellectual property.

Why does Australia need to transition to a knowledge economy?
We don’t make cars. In fact, we don’t make much of anything at a scale that can sustain Australia’s economic growth. We’ve also heard it a thousand times – the mining boom is over.

With traditionally tangible products becoming less valuable, Australia needs to to find value in its most widely available, yet currently most underused resource – brains!

Jobs – what will they look like in this crazy new economy?
On the whole, exactly the same. It’s where these jobs will be that will change. You can simplify what this will look like to some degree. Automation means less ‘traditional’ jobs on offer for everyone – neither blue collar or white collar are spared.

At the forefront of new and expanding job markets are the people with the brains – the scientists, the programmers, and the technical wizards. They are the ones who design the machines for assembly lines, who develop artificial intelligence to do the job of your amenable accountant and your local lawyer. They’re the ones with all of that lucrative knowledge tucked away, ready to be sold for a profit.

It’s the service industry that picks up the slack. Hospitality, tourism, and sales are where the next job boom will occur. In fact, these three industries – along with healthcare and social services – are tipped to see the largest growth of new employment over the next five years.

What’s the one thing I need to remain a valuable employee in this disrupted world?
The one single thing? Fortunately, it’s the one thing we all possess at some level or another – creativity.

No matter where you work, no matter what your role is, it’s creativity that will make you a truly valuable asset.

Technology is already taking care of the menial tasks such as counting, pushing buttons, and driving. These technological disruptions are set to continue as the knowledge economy picks up pace.

Thinking outside the box and creative problem solving is what will set you apart. Every business within every industry will need more creativity. Whether it’s taking a creative approach to customer service, developing the next creative billion dollar time-saving gadget, or even becoming that creative storyteller you’ve always dreamed of – it’s our creativity that the machines can’t take away from us. At least… not yet anyway.

This article was written by Simon Conibear from iRecruit Australia.

Image source: associationsnow.com

Why many recruiters have a sheep mentally? (and why it is hurting you)

As a digitally savvy entrepreneur with an interest in the industry, I see the same mistakes being made by nearly every recruiter. Worst of all, nearly everyone is doing the same thing and afraid to push the boundaries. It’s what I call the sheep mentality. Let’s just do what everyone else is doing as it seems to work and we get ok results. Comments like “we have always done it like this” will soon see some recruiters redundant if they don’t change their ways and embrace the digital world.

So how do know if you are guilty of this sheep mentally? Start by asking yourself these questions:

  • Do I reach out to candidates on Linked In only when I want to interview someone for a role I am trying to fill?
  • Am I really using Linked In effectively to elevate my personal and business brand?
  • Have I fully optimised my LinkedIn page to make it searchable?
  • Do people compliment me on my digital visibility?
  • Is my social media stream mainly full of job ads?
  • Do I write articles that don’t offer my clients or candidates any value at all because they are too sales focused?
  • Do I understand how to leverage my brand across traditional and digital platforms?
  • Am I taking opportunities to leverage my companies content?
  • Is my content focused on me rather than being focused on client and candidate outcomes?
  • Can I name 3 things that I’m doing that no one else (or very few people) in my industry do? (be honest)
  • Do I keep up to date on the latest digital trends, tools & platforms in order to stay ahead of my competitors?
  • Am I overwhelmed by digital and don’t know where to start?

I guarantee your digital visibility isn’t being optimised to its full potential which equals missed opportunities.

Digital provides a massive opportunity for recruiters to create valuable and networks that are engaged and not just sit on a database.  Using digital channels you can find, communicate and build relationships with clients and candidates Australia wide (or across the Globe if that’s your goal). You can join in with various communities, show your expertise, share your brand culture, find prospects, build long term relationships and have two way communication.

Digital has changed the way you should be doing business. But you need to start thinking differently and find ways to use your digital channels to innovate. This video on looking outside your industry might help to get you started.